Posts

Windows Virtual Desktop "Spring Update" enters general availability and gets a name change

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On the 27th of July  2020  a new set of capabilities of Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD) entered general availability. This means anyone can go to the Azure Portal and deploy production Windows Virtual Desktop and deliver Virtual Desktops from the Cloud. This set of new features and capabilities during the public preview were referred to as the “Spring 2020 Update”. As part of this update this set of capabilities is now referred to as just “ Windows Virtual Desktop ”, whilst the original version, that was known as “Fall 2019 Release” is now referred to as “ Windows Virtual Desktop Classic ”.

How to create delegated admin for Windows Virtual Desktop in Azure

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Most organisations will have some form of delegated administration for their on-premises Virtual Desktop estate. Likewise most organisations doing anything in Azure will also have delegation to enable different administrators access to just the services they need to see from within the Azure Portal This is all made possible through the Azure Role Based Access Control Service . One of the main benefits of the Windows Virtual Desktop Spring Update being integrated with Azure Resource Manager (ARM) is that you can now apply RBAC against all of the Windows Virtual Desktop objects. This allows you to set granular access permissions that align with your administrative set-up in any format that works for your organisation - be that specific object, technology, business unit or project based.

How to deploy Windows Subsytem for Linux 2 with WVD

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In a previous blog  I showed how you could use Linux in Windows Virtual Desktop when we don't actually support Linux hosts. This is possible by deploying "Nested Virtualisation" which is available on certain Azure Virtual Machines.  This then allows you to run Hyper-V on your Azure VM. Inside Hyper-V you can then run any other "nested" VM, including a Linux distro. You can also run the Windows Subsystem for Linux. This allows you to interact with the VM through the locally installed Linux distro from within Windows. With the release of the Windows 2004 release we have also released Windows Subsystem version 2. More information in WSL2 is available in this announcement blog So how do you enable WSL2 from within Windows Virtual Desktop? - Read on.......

How to Shadow across multiple host pools and multiple users

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* **Update 07/07/2020** The below multi host pool, multi user shadowing tool now supports both Spring and Fall Releases in the same tool. The updated tool is available here:  https://github.com/GarryDown/WVD-Shadowing/tree/master/Spring%20Edition * I get a lot of customer questions about how to shadow user sessions in Windows Virtual Desktop, and so I started listing the various options on Twitter and LinkedIn. #WVD Tip - (well reminder!) Do you need to shadow another WVD session? We have a cmd for that: mstsc.exe /v:<VMName> or <IP> /shadow:<sessionID> /noconsentPrompt #WindowsVirtualDesktop — Tom Hickling (@tomhickling) June 17, 2020   #WVD Tip – How to shadow option 2. Do you need to shadow another WVD session? We have an app for that: "Quick Assist" #WindowsVirtualDesktop @wvdcommunity pic.twitter.com/J9gphJl7R2 — Tom Hickling (@tomhickling) June 20, 2020 These options all work fine, but they all require you as the admin to go into the tooling and

Using Azure Image builder and Azure Shared Image Gallery with WVD

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Here at Microsoft we love three letter acronym's, so much so that we have a three letter acronym, TLA for three letter acronym's. This blog manages the triple of TLA's, namely AIB, SIG and WVD. This blog is about how you can use Azure Image Builder with Shared Image Gallery to deploy WVD Host pools. If you are doing anything with Windows Virtual Desktop you are going to want to start using Azure Image builder to create images to be used in WVD Host pools, as well as Azure Shared Image Gallery to store and distribute these images. This will make your life a lot lot easier. In this article I show you a simple "kickstarter" example of how you can use Azure Image Builder (AIB) to build a Windows 10 Multi Session image and then place this in Azure Shared Image Gallery (SIG) to version the image and then distribute the image to a number of global Azure regions. This then allows you to create a Windows Virtual Desktop host pool locally based upon that replicated image. A

The WVD Log in process and Active Directory topologies explained

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Working at Microsoft as a Windows Virtual Desktop Global Black Belt, a couple of question that I often get asked is "what Active Directory topologies does Windows Virtual Desktop support?", and "how does the user login process work"? This article should hopefully answer both for you. The TL DR answer is that WVD does not impose any specific Active Directory topology requirements of its own, and will work in any supported topology that you have deployed.  However, there are some things that you need to consider when designing a WVD deployment. As it stands today, access into the Windows Virtual Desktop service and onto the WVD session host, requires authenticating firstly against Azure Active Directory (AAD) and secondly against either Active Directory (AD DS) or Azure Active Directory Domain Services (AAD DS). In addition, there is a service called the "Identity Matching" service that ensures that the actual user is the same person logging in at both p

Visually presenting Windows Virtual Desktop monitoring information in Power BI

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The question I get asked frequently is "how do I visualise Windows Virtual Desktop logging and monitoring information"? So a new PaaS role of Windows Virtual Desktop has been the new Diagnostics service, from which you can get a whole host of - well, diagnostics. As part of the Spring Release of Windows Virtual Desktop we have now made it easier to connect every Windows Virtual Desktop ARM object to three services for the storage of those diagnostics - more on that later. One of those three services: Log Analytics can be easily integrated with another service called Power BI for the visualisation of a whole host of data sources. The official Windows Virtual Desktop documentation on this is here . This article is broken down to three sections. Section 1 - how to create a Log Analytics Workspace. Section 2 - how to connect the Windows Virtual Desktop ARM objects to Log Analytics. This also has a                       growing collection of Kusto sample queries to help you o